Archive : 2020

March 18 - April 4, 2020



Denise Honan

Actuality

Denise Honan is a multidisciplinary artist currently undertaking a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at RMIT. An exploration of traditional and non traditional casting methods and engagement with found orcommercially unviable materials and their inherent properties is a focus of her current practice. This exhibition is a series of small sculptures resulting from these rigorous examinations.



Monique Barnett

Approaches to:

After a 13 month studio residency in Hamburg Germany at Frappant .eV Barnet stages an experimental painting installation. Collage, paint and drawing techniques are used to navigate  how the body and personhood connect to space and movement and the flow of the contemporary era. Barnett is interested in the space that individuals inhabit within this constant change and the parallel between the concept of water and the human condition. Individuals, like water, are in constant flux and states of transition, always the same but always different, drifting in the never ending stream of time. Barnett's expanded approach to painting attempts to open opportunity within the limitations of painting. Materials layer in space and lead to unfolding possibilities.  



Evan Whittington

Dance to Feel Good Cmon!

Captivated by rhythm the body moves fluidly, repetitively and freely. Music and movement become inseparable, fusing in time and space. Dancer and dance are one and the same. Dance to Feel Good C’mon! uses the embodied experience of dancing as a point of departure for the generation of abstract paintings

Evan Whittington’s practice centres around a sustained engagement with drawing as a method for developing work that explores embodied movement, rhythm and dancing as expressions and manifestations of space, time and subjectivity. Evan’s studio outcomes manifest in a range of mediums including painting, video, drawings and installations using movement, lights and sound.

 




February 26 - March 14, 2020



Robin Fucking Watts

Corallium occultum

This is a collection of recent process focussed works which incorporate randomness via the use of a generative tool that the artist has made called the stochastic wheel. This is Robin Watt’s first solo exhibition.



Al Ouchtomsky

The joke is on me

The Joke is on me features a collection of amalgamated sculptures. Some of the pieces have been modelled from scratch as polygon meshes or digitally sculpted with a tablet. Others are hybrids, incorporating files downloaded from online 3D Supermarkets and pieces of toys bought from thrift stores.

Adaptations of pop culture toys, sci fi vehicles and action figurine appendages are presented in various combinations. 

The resulting work is an investigation into the ridiculous, it endeavours to explore the conundrum of overwhelming possibilities to appropriate, hijack and recompose in 3D.

This is Al Ouchtomsky’s first solo exhibition working in this medium.  



Bill Lane

Words Cannot Express

A project about true crimes, consumer culture and the unreliable nature of language.

It begins with the shocking moment you hear about a horrendous crime. The shock of it changing your perception of … everything.

Despite this shock my world goes back to normal. The horror diminished with each passing news cycle.

Yet there is a different kind of horror : the horror of remembering that I have forgotten what shouldn’t be forgotten. So I build scenes using everyday objects and the words from the horror. I build to remember the feeling of the moment when I heard about the horror.




February 5 - February 22, 2020



Fiona Barbetti

Highly Evolved

With a multidisciplinary practice encompassing photography, painting and installation, Barbetti’s creative practice is reflective of her own happenings in life and explores concepts of identity, everyday experience, nostalgia, light and shade. Her understanding of identity and being part of the bigger world have been a thread of exploring the human condition that is weaved through her work. The individual bodies of work have become a natural progression and extension of what she trying to express and work through within her life.



Jas Shalimar , Cal Skimin , Giulia Cattaneo , Hootan Heydari

The Gap, the Interval and the In-Between

A gap is a leap between two things, a stutter in space. 

In-betweens are liminal spaces of transition, outwardly presenting as nothing. 

The temporal lapse is an interval in which nothing or something takes place: the time out, the silence or the scream. 

The Gap, the Interval and the In-between run concurrently within our four practices.

Hootan’s work is concerned with acts of compulsion that arise in the wake of migration and the ensuing sense of dislocation. Jas’ practice draws from personal histories, gleaned materials and a language of subtle gestures, to elevate and draw attention to the everyday, to the juxtaposed spaces that require attentive focal shifting and act as a reminder of liminality. Looking at grounds and interstices as generative sites, Giulia’s work is contingent on the found, given and discarded things, testing their potential to shift values and ask for engagement with a set of spatiotemporally entangled thoughts, agencies and actions. 

Callan’s practice is centered around the notion of the camera as an extension of the self, both physically and psychically; an augmented memory-gatherer that expands and contracts both temporally and spatially interrogating the change in the autobiographical when it is written through the ever-shifting perspective of the lens.

In conversation, all four artists gravitated towards the idea of discarding selectively in order to preserve. By creating Gaps, Intervals and In-between spaces to examine memory, the act of selective collection, and concentrated focus that requires everything else to drop away they found avenues for further exploration of their concerns. Their thoughts, processes, and subsequent reflections overlap and spill into each other’s practices. They search the limits of their differing perspectives, with the aim of attending to the unattended in the everyday. They question their relationship to the spaces they move through. By isolating parts, like a camera acting selectively, slicing out a small portion of the visible world for examination, The Gap, The Interval And The In-Between carves out segments of our surroundings for closer inspection.



Guillaume Montgomery

God , Girls and Goobers

Gallery 3 gathers a gamut of graven gems, by the grey-haired glitterbug gringo Guillaume, who has a gift of grey matter for ghostly graphics of great gravitas.




January 15 - February 1, 2020



Gabrielle Spinoso

The Space In-between

This series of work is focused on the contrast between patterns in natural landscape and urban forms. I want to portray these paintings with my distinctive style, using shades and splices of colour, which is inspired by the natural shapes created by majestic mountainous landscapes contrasted with urban forms in a dream like state. The works in this exhibition will mainly focus on my love for European mountains with pastel buildings also looking at archways and tunnels that create natural colour blocking.



Lucy Kingsley

A New Space Made Possible By Loss

This body engages with the concept of the wound in terms of trauma. 

Within this collection of work broader narratives are explored. These include contact and boundaries, horror and underlying violence, the ritualistic and the ceremonial, and health and un-health. 

Lucy is an emerging Narrm/Melbourne-based visual artist and physical theatre performer generating video and photographic works. Her practice is supported by an exploration of painting, drawing, collage, costuming, sculpture and creative writing. 

The work hopes to produce a course of thinking much like a wound; open and incomplete.



Shannon McCulloch

But I Dream Of You Almost Every Night

I want to show you something.

Will you come with me?

Well, yeah.

Hey. Do you know who that guy is?

Dude, l don't even know who l am.

Oh, well, you're Pablo Picasso.

-Really?

-No. Not really.

This is my studio.

l don't know who you are, ____...

...But l dream about you

almost every night

Why?